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    • Emergency Preparedness

      From its beginning, the Scouting movement has taught young people to do their best, to do their duty to God and country, to help others, and to prepare themselves physically, mentally, and morally to meet these goals. The basic aims of Scouting include teaching young people to take care of themselves, to be helpful to others, and to develop courage, self-reliance, and the ability to be ready to serve in an emergency.

      The Emergency Preparedness BSA Award, first introduced in 2003 and updated in 2014, was designed with the aims mentioned above in mind. The award has been earned by tens of thousands of Scouts and Scouters individually, with their unit, or at a large event such as a jamboree. By developing these lifelong skills, Scouts have been instrumental in helping their communities recover from emergencies. 

      When an emergency does occur, it can affect every BSA youth and adult member in the immediate area. Earning the award teaches participants to respond first, as an individual; second, as a member of a family; and third, as a member of a Scouting unit serving their neighborhood and community. This award will allow all Scouts and Scouters to become informed, be prepared, and act promptly and appropriately in the event of emergencies, whether they are natural or man-made.

      Scouts and adult leaders can earn the individual Emergency Preparedness Award. Meanwhile, units, districts, and councils can work toward earning the bronze, silver, or gold achievement level. The awards are available at local Scout shops once specific requirements for each rank or achievement level have been met.

    • The Award

      When a member has fulfilled the requirements, a completed application is submitted to the council. Upon approval, an Emergency Preparedness pin is awarded. The pin may be worn on civilian clothing or on the uniform, centered on the left pocket flap. The award may be earned more than once; for instance, as a young person advances through the ranks and is capable of more complex preparedness activities, but only one pin may be worn.

      Individual Emergency Preparedness Award Requirements

      Tiger Cub Requirements

      1. Cover a family fire plan and drill, and what to do if separated from the family.
      2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.
      3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
      4. Take a nationally recognized first-aid course geared toward children such as American Red Cross First Aid for Children Today (FACT).
      5. Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.
      6. Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

      Wolf Cub Scout Requirements

      1. Create a checklist to keep your home safe.
      2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.
      3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
      4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
      5. Join a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
      6. Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

      Bear Cub Scout Requirements

      1. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
      2. Learn how to shut off utilities to your home in an emergency.
      3. Learn simple rescue techniques.
      4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
      5. Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.
      6. Organize a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
      7. Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

      Webelos Scout Requirements

      1. Learn rescue techniques.
      2. Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project.
      3. Take a first-aid course.
      4. Learn to survive extreme weather situations.
      5. Learn about stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
      6. Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.

      Unit Volunteer Scouter Requirements

      This award is available to all registered Scouters who serve a unit, including all leaders and committee members.

      Do any three of the following:

      1. Provide input to develop or improve an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
      2. Participate actively in preparing an emergency action plan for your Scouting unit meeting place. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
      3. Put together a unit emergency kit to be kept at your unit meeting location. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
      4. Take a basic first-aid/CPR/AED course.
      5. Participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for disaster preparedness.
      6. Complete IS-100.b, Introduction to Incident Command System (see http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp ).
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